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2016-05-13 | NC CRIME LAB CONUNDRUM - WWAY Investigation
“One, try them just based on the visual aspects of their impairment without being able to prove the drug,” Old said. “There certainly are cases where anecdotally we’ve had to dismiss cases because we don’t have the results in a timely enough fashion.” Criminal defense attorney Buddy Allard said sometimes that means a win for them. “There have been plenty of times where myself and other defense lawyers like me have reaped the benefit of the state’s inability to get that blood test down,” Allard said.

2016-05-11 | Murder Investigations Examined as Unsolved Cases Continue to Rise
According to a new study by Michigan State University, the role of the homicide investigator might be shifting in today’s world, and a closer look at the changing needs of murder investigations might help stem the declining clearance rates nationwide. Lead researcher and MSU professor David Carter said there is no clear “silver bullet.”

2016-05-11 | Murder Investigations Examined as Unsolved Cases Continue to Rise
According to a new study by Michigan State University, the role of the homicide investigator might be shifting in today’s world, and a closer look at the changing needs of murder investigations might help stem the declining clearance rates nationwide. Lead researcher and MSU professor David Carter said there is no clear “silver bullet.”

2016-05-11 | Slow crime lab stalls Teton cops
The information to bring the investigation back to the forefront for the Jackson Police Department must come from the Wyoming State Crime Lab. Investigators sent evidence from the scene to the lab shortly after the fire in April 2015. There has been no word since then on when the lab will run tests on that evidence, meaning that police have been waiting for results for more than a year.

2016-05-06 | Disgraced Lab Analyst Was High Almost Daily for 8 Years
Details from one of Massachusetts’ worst crime lab scandals were released from the state Attorney General’s office, and could possibly call tens of thousands of cases into question. Farak admitted to being high almost daily for eight years, using methamphetamines, ketamine, cocaine, LSD and other drugs—and even testified in court while using drugs.

2016-05-04 | Coast crime lab still sits empty one year later
The crime lab in Biloxi still sits empty more than a year after state lawmakers funded the facility. That's because the state can't seem to find a pathologist who wants to take the job in South Mississippi.

2016-05-03 | Humans-Pigs-Rabbits Decomposition Study to Impact Court Cases Worldwide
For years, forensic court cases worldwide have routinely used animal models to estimate time since death, or postmortem interval, of human remains, largely because access to human subjects was not available. The UT study shows that doing so could yield flawed results because decomposition rates, insect activity, and scavenger activity vary greatly between human and nonhuman subjects. The study indicates that human decomposition is much more variable than that of either pigs or rabbits.

2016-05-02 | DNA backlog at Austin police crime lab could slow massive case review
Prosecutors in Travis County have since joined a massive statewide effort to re-evaluate cases affected by the miscalculations. But the Austin Police Department’s crime lab, which will have to recalculate statistics on about half of the 1,297 Travis County cases identified so far, is still validating new software and updating its protocols. Meanwhile, the lab’s backlog of cases awaiting DNA analysis has risen to about 1,300, the most in the past five years.

2016-05-02 | Inside the FBI’s Colossal Fingerprint Factory
Before the FBI went digital, it looked a little more like a giant stock warehouse for Amazon.com. In the 1920s, the bureau was only employing 25 workers to classify around 800,000 print cards, but by 1943, there were more than 20,000 employees sorting through 70 million fingerprints.

2016-05-02 | How child predator was caught by tiny clue in photo he posted online
"Utilizing some technology that hadn't even been released to the public yet we were able to take a look at the bottle and reverse out some of the motion blur," Cole said. They can now see the offender's first name "Stephen," the first two letters of the last name and the first three digits on the prescription order. With that he applies to the pharmacy for the customer details of every person who fits that criteria. It narrows the list down to a man named "Stephen Keating." But that's not all. The offender's fingers are also in the picture and incredibly this crack team manages to pull the fingerprints from the image.

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