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In The News

 

2012-09-07 | St. Paul to spend $140,800 to review, fix troubled crime lab
St. Paul Police Chief Thomas Smith announced his plan to order a review of the crime lab in mid-July, but the police department did not provide details until Thursday. According to documents provided by the St. Paul Police Department, the city of St. Paul signed six-month contracts with Iowa-based Schwarz Forensic Enterprises and Texas-based Integrated Forensic Laboratories in late August.

2012-08-28 | Establishing the Quantitative Basis for Sufficiency Thresholds and Metrics for Friction Ridge Pattern Detail and the Foundation for a Standard
The purpose of this two-year project has been to address the need for a sound, quantitative basis for assessing the quality of fingerprint images. Latent prints, in particular, can be problematic because they are often partial, smudged, and otherwise distorted.

2011-08-04 | Fingerprint breakthrough offers new forensic evidence
Researchers at Sheffield Hallam University have developed a way to capture fingerprints that can identify substances touched, and secretions from a person's body.

2011-06-06 | Australia breakthrough on recovering old fingerprints
The scientists, at the University of Technology in Sydney, believe it is a world first, that could help police reopen unsolved cases. They used nanotechnology to detect dry and weak fingerprints, which are not revealed by traditional techniques. Nanotechnology reveals much sharper detail of amino acid traces from old fingerprints than existing methods.

2011-05-27 | Dangerous debris, evidence left in closed Detroit Police crime lab
Thousands of rounds of live ammunition, sealed evidence kits and case files -- some containing Social Security numbers of rape and assault victims -- lay amid rubble in a crime lab abandoned by Detroit police two years ago. The Free Press discovered the ruins this week. Judicial experts expressed shock that evidence would be handled so recklessly. "It's incomprehensible that any law enforcement agency would not be mindful to preserve evidence," Wayne County Circuit Judge Timothy Kenny said.

2009-06-18 | Keystone Cops at the Police Lab
Many criminalists indeed serve justice well, conscientiously analyzing evidence found at crime scenes, including blood, fingerprints, scrapings from beneath fingernails, hair, dirt, shoe impressions, tire tracks, hard copy documents, computer messages and more. The good ones keep up with new forensic techniques, write objective reports, consult openly with defense attorneys as well as prosecutors, testify truthfully in court and never lose sight of the ultimate goal — convicting the guilty while excluding the innocent from the pool of suspects.

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